International Art Materials Association

April 7, 2021





Thank you to the Namta membership for approving the 2021/22 Board of Directors slate.


To the right are the names of your 2021/22
Namta Board of Directors.

Thank you to Phil King for all he did for Namta as President. We now look forward to working with Steve Chamberlain as our new President, along with Doug Mooney as our President Elect.

We are very pleased to have Mike Roche and Darin Rinne remaining on the Board, and happy to welcome Tom James and Ashley Lee who are the Board as Directors.

Cheers to a good 2021 and 2022 for Namta and its members, and to a great 2022 show in Orlando!

 




PRESIDENT

Steve Chamberlain
colart Americas

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
Phil King
SLS Arts

PRESIDENT ELECT
Doug Mooney
Mooney Sales & Marketing

Mike Roche
Rileystreet Art Supply

Darin Rinne
Wet Paint, Inc.

Tom James
Opus
 
Ashley Lee
Fredrix Artist Canvas/Tara Materials

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Remote Selling Best Practices

from leaders at Zoom,
Salesforce and DocuSign


The disruptions of 2020 changed how buyers buy and sellers sell. Remote selling is now the norm: 96% of B2B organizations have shifted their go-to-market model…. technology has given sellers unprecedented virtual access to decision-makers and the ability to get business done from anywhere, but it also makes the remote sales process even more competitive.


Some of the top challenges facing sales organizations today are keeping deals moving through the sales process, maintaining customer relationships, and collaborating to close deals.....
Read Article

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An advocacy group called Autypical has created an online platform for autistic children and young adults from across India to showcase their art.


The idea is to create an online platform for autistic artists. “It will shine light on the abilities of the autistic population particularly in relation to art. Scientific data indicates that they are very gifted in terms of art,” explained Rashmi Das, managing director of Autypical.

Rashmi was inspired to launch Autypical after her son Suhrid’s online art store took off..... Read Article






Autism and Art are a most powerful intercept with children and their continued progress.

“Art therapy is a distinct treatment for autism and can be an alleviating activity, help reduce some of its symptoms, provide an outlet for self expression, and encourage social interaction in a fun environment.” 
from - www.act-today.org


See more Facts

Visit Namtaartadvocacy.org

 

 

Art Caravan- PH
Located in the Philippines




"A platform to express artistic selves through art.
Art Essentials on hand."


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Web Articles of Interest


A 3-Step Plan for handling any PR Crisis
Crisis PR is one of those areas of business that you absolutely have to get right the first time around. That's because crisis PR is a response to a problem — and in many cases, a severe problem.....  Read Article



How to Engineer what People think of Your Business, Your Product and You
What exactly is public relations? I think every PR pro has been asked this question a hundred times. However, it’s sometimes worse when people think they know what public relations is and start referring to a TV show like Scandal or a movie where the public relations professional is “the fixer” for a celebrity..... Read Article
 

Supplier Product Guide

 



Did you miss seeing
ManufacturersHealthcare.com
at Art Materials World/Creativation+?

If you did, here is some info for you:

Sign-up now to speak with Paul Rosenkampff about your healthcare coverage options as a Namta Member. He can walk you through the process and answer all your questions. Paul has been an advisor for 20 years and is here to help you and your team find the option that best fit your needs.

You can also take a look at this
Recording
about Health Care Options for Namta Members from ManufacturersHealthCare.com

See New Products from Namta Suppliers


Art Materials Retailer Magazine
is for people who sell Art Supplies




FOR SALE

Business Opportunity in Alaska

 
Well-established art supplies and framing store located in Homer, Alaska - one of Alaska's most scenic and creative coastal communities. Owner retiring. Owner is a Namta member. Sale includes inventory, framing supplies, fixtures, POS and more. Prime location, great landlord.
Listed for sale with Kachemak Group Real Estate/Karen Marquardt 907-299-1775.
 www.HomerArtandFrame.com.


If you have news, or want to be In The Spotlight, please fill out this form for consideration in an upcoming issue.

 

 

 

Remote Selling Best Practices


from Leaders at Zoom, Salesforce and DocuSign

Find this article at www.docusign.com

Published August 2020

The disruptions of 2020 changed how buyers buy and sellers sell. Remote selling is now the norm: 96% of B2B organizations have shifted their go-to-market model…. technology has given sellers unprecedented virtual access to decision-makers and the ability to get business done from anywhere, but it also makes the remote sales process even more competitive.

Some of the top challenges facing sales organizations today are keeping deals moving through the sales process, maintaining customer relationships, and collaborating to close deals. Docusign ….. hosted a special virtual event with Salesforce and Zoom called Keep the World Selling and Buying centering on how businesses can accelerate the sales process in changing times, how the buying experience has changed, and best practices for the future of sales.

What’s different about remote selling?

One of the biggest changes for sales organizations is that most sellers have been thrust into the world of remote inside selling. Online meetings have become the norm, bringing many technologies and tools together, like video conferencing, electronic agreements, and CRM. According to McKinsey, almost 90% of sales have moved to a videoconferencing, phone, or web process. This shift changes the very model with which most salespeople have grown accustomed.

That’s why sellers need to adapt. “The old world Glengarry Glen Ross model of ‘always be closing’ was already on its way out - it’s dead. I think the new mantra has to be ‘always be helping,’” said Doug Camplejohn, Executive Vice President of Sales Cloud at Salesforce. Sellers need to be agile as markets fluctuate, understand the customers’ business landscape, and offer flexibility in the deal process and structure.

The panel also agreed that sellers need to adapt to become better listeners, and have greater compassion to connect with those they’re meeting with. Ryan Azus, Chief Revenue Officer at Zoom, added that this is especially true when thinking about how to protect a deal from slipping. “You can’t pretend to have all the answers to what the future holds. It’s more important to build hypotheses with the customer to co-create what the future will be, and insert your product or offering into those scenarios. Encourage salespeople to ask prospects: what does buying look like in your organization today? Don’t just guess.”

How has the buying experience changed?

Customer expectations have changed. Now, more than ever, buyers expect salespeople to be on a journey with them and to be empathetic to their situation, whatever it may be. “Buyers are really looking for speed and expertise from companies,” said Scott Olrich, COO at DocuSign. “Not just what they’ve done in the past, but how are they going to help them right now, during the recovery, and more importantly, position them to succeed in the future.”

The deep uncertainty of the current times is paralyzing to some buyers. Lack of confidence in what the future holds has changed the buying experience in three ways. Buyers are now:

  • Refocusing corporate buying priorities on tools and technologies that are absolutely essential.
  • Bringing in more people to the decision-making process as budgets shrink and scrutiny increases.
  • Looking for speed and transparency in how tools and technology are going to help them recover and move forward.

Trust, which Camplejohn notes involves consistent behavior over time, can be eroded very quickly. Companies that have earned trust with customers need to invest into keeping it. One way to do this is to come to the table with stories of how other customers have adapted and succeeded with your product during these times. Olrich agreed that the need for recent customer case studies is more obvious than ever.

“You really need to talk through the customer lens and be able to articulate how you can drive urgency and how you’ve successfully done that and been an essential solution for others,” said Olrich.



Online Art Platform 
       Seeks to Break the Stigma of Autism


Article from www.newslaundry.comm
by Proma Chakrabort - April 2021


An advocacy group called Autypical has created an online platform for autistic children and young adults from across India to showcase their art.

The idea is to create an online platform for autistic artists. “It will shine light on the abilities of the autistic population particularly in relation to art. Scientific data indicates that they are very gifted in terms of art,” explained Rashmi Das, managing director of Autypical.

Rashmi was inspired to launch Autypical after her son Suhrid’s online art store took off. “When it was well received, I thought if my child could do good art, it was high time I did something for all autistic children.”

Surhid, 15, is a non-verbal autistic with co-occurring epilepsy, and is a visual learner. Since he was two, colours and textures have been his sensory fixations. He paints for several hours each week with an array of brushes, rollers, and sponges, and his workplace has a liberal spread of easels and colour. He has heightened sensitivity for textures and colours, and usually chooses a bright palette of colours for his works. Several of his paintings have been bought at art exhibitions.

Autism in India

India doesn’t have proper statistical data on autism because the diagnosis rates are low. Lack of awareness, notions of stigma, and superstition are all contributing factors for the low rate of diagnosis.

Now, though, attempts are being made to do away with the stigma and give strength to more parents. In this regard, Rashmi explained that “Autypical” is a lexical innovation.

“The a-word is handed as a diagnosis and the impact of this can be far-reaching and even devastating; not so much due to the challenges of the condition but because of the accompanying nomenclature and the resultant stigma that society imposes,” she said.

The idea that autistic children are not able to do anything is the biggest stereotype this initiative hopes to break. “Just like you have neurotypical, autypicals cannot be chastised because of their neuro developmental conditions,” Rashmi said.

She has had bad experiences with schools. While Surhid is now studying in a private school where major highlights of his Individualized Education Plan, or IEP, are in art, he was discriminated against in other schools, she claimed.

According to Rashmi, schools tend to give labels such as “high functioning and low functioning” to autistic kids, labels that should be dispensed with. Autypical follows this practice in describing the works on its platform. They have gone with one label – autistic.

Agreeing with Rashmi, Shweta Vaidya shared her ordeal with schools. Her son Jai Vaidya, 16, has autism along with Type 1 diabetes. To find the right set of doctors, therapists and educators has been tough for her.

Jai waits the whole year for his birthday. It’s the only day he can eat pizza, burger and chocolate cake to his heart’s content. With his photographic memory, he takes only a few seconds to play a tune on a piano.

At a time when he didn’t even know the alphabet, Jai could write movie names backwards. Today, he can recall the names of films he has watched in a particular cinema hall, in the same sequence. Jai knows the exact times of a movie scene, or a song line, or even a word in an audio or video clip. He types fast, and loves cycling, swimming, and is a big foodie.

Over two years ago, he became interested in art. Shweta took to writing blogs to document his journey and what she learned from it. In her first blog, she shared her experience from when Jai was diagnosed with autism. “Something is not right,” she said to herself. He had started regressing when he was around 14 months old, finding it hard to make eye contact, understand language, and generally respond.

Shweta looked up “child not responding” and started reading up online. This is how she stumbled upon autism.

“Autism diagnosis is a grey area initially if the child seems to be on the borderline. It's a whole spectrum from mild to severe. The diagnosis is not that difficult as the acceptance is. The diagnosis is still easy to accept if it were you, but here, it’s your child who is being diagnosed. Most of the parents would not want anything to happen to their child which is not normal as per rules set by society,” she said.

She recalled that she and her husband were bent on curing him in the first few years, to get him to be “normal”. Eventually, as Jai was diagnosed with diabetes, she grew more concerned about handling his autism, his therapies, giving him medication and insulin, preparing food charts on an hourly basis.

For non-verbal autistic Aditi Somyanaryan, 15, last year was a unique one. The lockdown took her understanding of structure and threw it out the window, replacing it with something new and unknown. Though regular online classes ensured continuity in learning, it was online art classes that helped her adapt to learn in a new way and gave an expression to some of her emotions.

Art is a skill that RM Karthik, 16, from Chennai, acquired and became devoted to during the lockdown. The detailing and colour in his works, though, give an impression that he has been honing his skills for a while. The autistic teen also cleared his Class X through National Institute of Open Schooling.

The platform showcases works from artists aged five to 24. Rashmi is happy with the response the platform, launched on March 27, has received so far. “I see this community of autypical artists becoming a robust platform for inclusion and dignity. And we will shift the gear to ability. The children and their parents are the heroes,” she said.




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